Saturday, February 25, 2017

Month-of-Few Ingredients: Chicken Pinwheels


B.D.H. (Before Dear Husband), I had a male friend with a German heritage. Of course, I learned to make beef roulades and spaetzle to capture his interest. It is reminiscent of the applesauce cake I made in high school for a boy from church whom I wanted to notice me. I was so shallow back then! I know now my sparkling personality is what should draw them in. Or not. As the case may be.

Anyway, roulades are rolled meat (coming from the French for “to roll”) with a filling cooked in a pot of boiling broth. In more recent times, we fry or bake the roulades. Today’s chicken recipe, and dozens on the Internet, show some modern versions of the original heavier ones.

There are lots and lots of rolled-up chicken recipes out

there. The common components layered on the chicken, seem to be some green leafy vegetable, some sort of cheese, and an herb. Using that principle, you can create any number of flavor profiles with your chicken.

I found one with feta cheese, and arugula. I found one with blue cheese and spinach. There’s one with parmesan and shallots. Some have you wrap the cheese in some chicken filets with spinach or water cress or some such and brown in a skillet before putting in the oven to finish. There are lots and lots of options. We received some herbed cheeses for a gift that will end up inside a chicken pinwheel in the near future.

Instead of the tarragon in the following recipe, I’m going to use one of my spice blends next time. I think a Greek-spices chicken with feta would be lovely!

Here’s my today’s take on chicken pinwheels.

Chicken Pinwheels (serves 4)
4 strips of bacon, partially cooked
2 chicken breasts, sliced to make four filets (or buy 4 chicken filets)
4 tablespoons cream cheese, room temperature
2 teaspoons tarragon
Small handful of spinach
Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Put chicken into the oven for about 15 minutes. Remove and drain the fat. (See NOTE)

Meanwhile, if making your own filets, slice the chicken in half long ways. Cover with plastic wrap and, with your rolling pin, flatten the pieces to about ½” thick. Be gentle so you don’t tear the chicken.

On each piece of chicken, put one tablespoon of cream cheese and spread to cover the filet. Sprinkle a ½ teaspoon of tarragon on the cream cheese on each filet. Cover with spinach leaves.

Roll up each filet. Wrap a piece of bacon around the center of each filet, keeping the ends of the bacon and the seam of the chicken together. Place seam side down in a baking dish. Add salt and pepper if desired.

Bake for 40-55 minutes depending on the thickness of the pinwheel. Use a meat thermometer to get a temperature of 160 degrees in the thickest part.

NOTE: I always prepare my bacon in the oven rather than frying it. You can put it on a rack in the pan so the grease drains as it cooks. I use what I need from the package (like four strips today) and then put the rest in a zipper bag to use in other ways, like BLTAs (bacon, lettuce, tomato, and avocado sandwiches).

DH’s Rating: Five Tongues Up  “What’s in this? I like the bacon and chicken together.” He ate two pieces. He was only “supposed” to eat one. When I mentioned that I was full from eating my one, he responded. “Yeah, I should have only had one and a half. It’s filling.” So why did he eat both???

If you liked this recipe, I’d really appreciate you spreading the word on your social media outlets. Here are some pre-made Twitter and Facebook posts you can use or modify.

Tweet: @Good2Tweat’s #recipe for Chicken Pinwheels with cream cheese, tarragon, spinach, and bacon at http://bit.ly/2mondwe

Facebook: You say roulade, I say pinwheel. Whatever you call rolled up meat with a stuffing, you’re bound to like these Chicken Pinwheels with cream cheese, tarragon, spinach, and bacon from Sharon Arthur Moore at http://sharonarthurmoore.blogspot.com/2017/02/month-of-few-ingredients-chicken.html

A reminder:
House rules for what counts as an ingredient:
Salt and pepper are not ingredients.
Oil is not an ingredient when it’s for the cooking pan, not the recipe.
Water is not an ingredient.

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